University of Cambridge Museums

Projects, events and news from the University of Cambridge Museums

A treat for the senses at Twilight at the Museums

twilight_54 Martin BondWith glitter balls and sparkling minerals, animal sounds amongst glowing flora, spectacular light installations and flurries of snow, Twilight at the Museums was a treat for the senses.

Supported using public funding by Arts Council England, Twilight has been able to grow, and this year it took a step outside.  A light show projected on to the façade of the Fitzwilliam Museum creatively played with collections from across the venues:  dinosaurs nibbled at the building, plants became part of the structure, and paintings were brought to life.

Inside, the atmosphere was one of excitement and discovery.  Objects were scrutinised under torchlight, families wandered amongst the displays and the air was filled with chatter and merriment.

twilight_80 Martin BondThe University of Cambridge Museums along with Cambridge University Botanic Garden, Cambridge Folk Museum, Museum of Technology, Farmland Museum and Denny Abbey, Cambridge Science Centre, Official Cambridge Guides opened until 7.30 for this annual evening celebration of the magical collections and together welcomed over 7200 visits.

[embed width=”547″ height=”408″]http://www.flickr.com//photos/cambridgeuniversitymuseums/sets/72157632888818544/show/[/embed]

A fantastic team of volunteers supported staff in making the event a great success. A Twilight visitor said:

There was a lovely atmosphere in the museums and indeed in the city with floods of families out and about.  It was bitterly cold, but there was a real buzz and the staff and volunteers at all the venues were helpful and enthusiastic. Lovely.

Elly Wright, Events Coordinator, University of Cambridge Museums

Images; Martin Bond

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'Hangsha Salim, a 78 year-old Konyak Naga man with facial tattoo.' Photo by Peter Bos, subexposure.com (2016)

This stunning image forms a part of Another India, a new exhibition at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, opening tomorrow, 
8 March 2017 - 22 April 2018.

Marking the 70th anniversary of India’s independence from Britain, Another India examines the complex histories of some remarkable items from minority populations in India, and reveals how they came to be in the collections in Cambridge.

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This ball demonstrates the possibility of using four or more sets in a Venn diagram. Cambridge statistician Anthony Edwards worked with frustration over 2D Venn diagrams, which can only accommodate four sets by using distorted ellipses. Using a tennis ball he noted that by continually dividing the sphere with a curved line in a shape "precisely that of the seam of a tennis ball", it was possible to create a Venn diagram of four or more equally-sized sets.

This tennis ball is part of an exhibition called 'Why is this Here (WTH) at the Whipple Museum, showcasing objects that make museum staff wonder why on earth they're in a museum.

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